Magical Mercury (II) thiocyanate 

Mercury (II) thiocyanate is a white powder that creates a twisting solid (or serpent) when ignited. It is an inorganic compound so has been created with complex mercury ions that bond with the thiocyanate ions (sulphur, carbon and nitrogen). Carbon and nitrogen bond together to make cyanide, and any Mercury compound is toxic, so it’s…

Sponge science

I never really stopped to think about sponge as a living thing, but then a friend told me this awesome fact: YOU CAN PUSH A SPONGE THROUGH A SIEVE AND IT WILL PUT ITSELF BACK TOGETHER AGAIN!

Sunday Science – Soap Expansion

I like science and I really like seeing what happens when matter changes state – especially if it involves heating stuff or setting fire to it – so when I read about putting soap in a microwave I knew I had to try it!  The blog I read was at 5 Orange Potatoes and used…

The secret to giraffes’ long legs

Giraffes legs should be too skinny to hold their heavy weight.  Why don’t they break? Well, apparently it’s because they have a groove in their leg bone to protect the ligament.  This means that they can support themselves without needing lots of muscle.  Not having to use muscle means they don’t get tired so that…

Cooking success

The pinwheel pizzas were pretty epic! The dough didn’t go soggy at all and there wasn’t the problem of a crusty crust to deal with like on a normal pizza. Overall, a job well done. Verdict: curled is better than flat. And it contained at least two of my five a day 😉

Cooking science …

Cooking is  science, right?  Here are some cool pinwheel pizzas that I made tonight to my own original recipe.  I love Swiss Roll, Danish Pastries and Chelsea Buns, so how could a pizza not be made better by making it into a pinwheel? The possible scientific  downside is that the large surface area of dough…

Colourful ants

An ant’s stomach is transparent, so when they drink they absorb the colour of the liquid. Check out what happens when they drank coloured sugar water!

It’s a gas!

Nitrogen is used in Guinness to make a smoother drink because the bubbles are smaller than carbon dioxide. It is also used in aeroplane tyres because it can withstand the pressure of contact with the ground where other gases would make the tyres burst. Pretty cool stuff to do with the most abundant gas in…